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Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ) - John Seeley
The AAQ is a 9-item measure of experiential avoidance. This construct refers to the negative perception or evasion of personal thoughts and events. Such behavior has been associated with a range of clinical disorders from substance abuse to suicide. Each item in the scale depicts either an example of experiential avoidance or the lack there of (scores are reversed in the case of the latter). Respondents are to rate the frequency of each item on a 7-point Liker-type scale ranging from "never" to "always" true. Higher scores represent a greater degree of experiential avoidance.
Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ) - John Seeley
The ATQ is a 30-item questionnaire developed to identify and assess the frequency of automatic negative self-statements which are linked to depression. Each item is a negative thought and the respondent is to rate how often the thought has surfaced in the past week on a scale from 1 (not at all) to 5 (all the time).
Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y) - Shawn Boles
The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y) is a 17-item, recently revised to an 8-item measure, generated to represent a theoretically cohesive conceptualization of psychological inflexibility.
Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) - John Seeley
The BHS, a 20-item self-report assessment device, measures the extent to which the subject feels a negative expectation about their future. This construct of hopelessness has been linked to depression and suicidality. Respondents are to answer each item in true or false format based upon the events of the past week. Total scores range from 0-20 with higher scores representing a greater degree of hopelessness.
Center for Epidemiologic Studies--Depression Scale (CES-D) - John Seeley
The 20-item CES-D is a widely used, self-report measure of depressive symptomatology for use in community samples. The respondent is to rate the frequency of each item occurring in the past two weeks on a 4-point Likert-type scale ranging from "rarely or none" to "most or all" of the time.
Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale for Children (CES-DC) - John Seeley
The 20-item CES-DC was adapted from the original CES-D measure. The items were renovated to make it more understandable and applicable for children and adolescents. The respondent is to rate the frequency of each item occurring in the past two weeks on a 4-point Likert-type scale ranging from 0 (rarely or none) to 3 (most or all) of the time.
Checklist for Individual Student Systems (CISS) - Jeffrey Sprague
The Checklist for Individual Student Systems (CISS) is designed for school teams to self-assess the implementation status of secondary (targeted) and tertiary (intensive) behavior support systems within their school. The CISS is based on factors drawn from the Individual Student Systems Evaluation Tool (I-SSET), and the CISS is designed to answer three basic questions: 1) Are the foundational (organizational) elements in place for implementing secondary and tertiary behavior support practices? 2) Is a targeted behavior support system in place? 3) Is a function-based, intensive, individual behavior support system in place?
Child and Adolescent Disruptive Behavior Inventory (CADBI) Screener - Julie Rusby
The CADBI Screener is a brief questionnaire consisting of 25 items from the oppositional to peers, oppositional to adults, and the hyperactivity/impulsivity scales from the CADBI.
Child and Family Center Parent Questionnaire - Charlotte Winter
The Parent Questionnaire is an adapted measure from the Community Action for Successful Youth (CASY) questionnaire and CINT, parallel version to the CFCQC. The Parent Questionnaire instrument contains 52 items split into 7 sections of questions about a variety of the respondent's impressions about their relationship and interactions with their child, as well as their child's experiences at home and at school in the last three months, or in the last month. The sections deal with, in order, positive and helping behavior by their child (e.g., cooperate with his/her teachers), parental knowledge and involvement (e.g., know where your teen was after school), parental rules and expectations (e.g., I ____ that my teen should not use alcohol), feelings of trust, family closeness, and involvement (e.g., Ate a meal with at least one of my parents), parent/teen disagreements/fights (e.g., We got angry at each other), peer rejection of their child (e.g., criticized by peers for his or her looks or clothes), and a section of open-ended questions about parental goals, self-evaluation, concerns, and support networks.
Child and Family Center Youth Questionnaire - Charlotte Winter
The Teen Questionnaire is an adapted measure from the Community Action for Successful Youth (CASY) questionnaire and CINT, and a parallel version to the CFCQP. The Teen Questionnaire contains 92 items split into 11 sections of questions about a variety of the child's experiences at home, at school, and with parents in the last three months, or in the last month. The sections deal with, in order, positive and helping behavior (e.g., cooperate with your teachers), parental knowledge and involvement (e.g., know about your plans for the coming day), parental rules and expectations (e.g., My parent(s) ____ that I should not use alcohol), feelings of trust and family closeness (e.g., Ate a meal with at least one of my parents), parental disagreements (e.g., We got angry at each other), peer rejection (e.g., criticized by peers for your looks or clothes), positive peer behavior (e.g., help with chores around their house), peer problem behavior (e.g., How many of your friends have cheated on school tests?), recent associations with peers who engage in problem behavior (e.g., take things that don't belong to them), problem behavior (e.g., Spent time with gang members as friends), and open-ended questions about life goals, stressors, interests and support systems.
Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire-Revised (CASQ-R) - John Seeley
The CASQ-R is a shortened version of the original Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire (CASQ; Seligman et al., 1984). The original instrument was designed to assess how children explain positive and negative events through three dimensions of causality; internal-external, stable-unstable, and global-specific. More depressed subjects typically associate negative events with internal, stable, and global causes, and positive events with external, unstable, and specific causes. There are 24 items, each is an event (12 positive events and 12 negative events) with two choices for response which map onto one of the three dimensions of causality stated above.
Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) - John Seeley
The 27-item CDI is a self-report inventory used to measure depressive symptoms in children and adolescents between the ages of 7 to 17. Each item is a set of statements from which the respondent is to select three that best describes their thoughts and feelings in the past two weeks. A total score ranging from 0-54 is based on a five factor solution. The factors are mood, interpersonal problems, ineffectiveness, anhedonia, and negative self-esteem. A score above 19 suggests clinically significant depression.
Community Action for Successful Youth - Parenting and Family Measures - Julie Rusby
Parent and youth report of parenting practices and parent-child relationship items were adapted from prior empirical studies of coercive family processes and the role of conflict, monitoring, positive family relations, discipline, and positive reinforcement in the development of problem behaviors in children and adolescents.
CPRSK: Child Peer Social Skills - Tim Piehler
An 18-item questionnaire completed by adolescents evaluating parental knowledge of friends, peer acceptance and rejection, and deviant peer association.
Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) - John Seeley
The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) is a structured psychiatric diagnostic interview for children and adolescents aged 6 to 18, or their parents (Shaffer et al., 2000). It was developed primarily for epidemiological research but is also useful in clinical settings. The most recent version of the DISC (DISC-IV) is able to address more than 30 psychiatric diagnoses that occur in children and adolescents based on DSM-IV criteria. The DISC can be administered by trained lay interviewers. Most questions are worded so that they can be answered "yes", "no", and "somewhat" or "sometimes”. Questions reference the 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and year prior to the interview.
Effective Behavior Support (EBS) Survey: Assessing and Planning Behavior Support in Schools - Jeffrey Sprague
The EBS Survey is used by school staff for initial and annual assessment of effective behavior support systems in their school. The survey examines the status and need for improvement of four behavior support systems: (a) school-wide discipline systems, (b) non-classroom management systems (e.g., cafeteria, hallway, playground), (c) classroom management systems, and (d) systems for individual students engaging in chronic problem behaviors.
Effective Behavior Support (EBS) Team Implementation Checklist version 2.2 (Quarterly) - Jeffrey Sprague
This quarterly self-assessment tool has been designed to serve as a multi-level guide for (a) creating school-wide PBS action plans and evaluating the status of implementation activities on a quarterly basis.
Family Affective Attitude Rating Scale - Berni Bullock
25 item measure for coding Five Minute Audio Speech Samples for affective attitudes
Family Events Scale (FMEVE) - Charlotte Winter
Family Events Checklist - Parent (OSLC, 1985). This instrument includes 54 items which measure the occurrence of daily hassles and internal crises within the family. The respondent is asked to designate which of many negative events have occured in the last week and describe the level of negative effects on the respondent caused by the event. The instrument also includes three blanks for the respondent to include any other stressful events that ocurred in the last week. The measure has been used across several projects at OSLC and the CFC. Fischer and Fagot (1990) found three internally consistent scales: Daily Hassles, Economic Stress, and Internal Family Conflict. The scales differentiated low-risk from high-risk samples.
Functional Assessment Checklist for Teachers and Staff (FACTS) - Jeffrey Sprague
The FACTS is a two-page interview used by school personnel who are building behavior support plans. The FACTS is intended to be an efficient strategy for initial functional behavioral assessment. The FACTS is completed by people (teachers, family, clinicians) who know the student best, and used to either build behavior support plans, or guide more complete functional assessment efforts.
Functional Behavior Assessment Behavior Support Plan (F-BSP) Protocol - Jeffrey Sprague
The F-BSP is a planning tool for used by school personnel who are building a behavior support plan using function based behavioral assessment. This form has a Competing Pathway Chart or Competing Behavior Chart available for planning purposes.
Hopelessness Scale for Children (HSC, HPLS) - John Seeley
The HPLS is a 17-item version of the Beck Hopelessness Scale designed for use with children or adolescents who can read at the first to second grade level. This self-report assessment device measures the extent to which the subject feels a negative expectation about their future. The construct of hopelessness has been linked to depression and suicidality. Respondents are to answer each item in true or false format based upon the events of the past week. Total scores range from 0-20 with higher scores representing a greater degree of hopelessness.
In-School Survey of School Climate - Julie Rusby
Overall school climate: safety, peer harassment, and positive support
Mood and Feelings Questionnaire- (MFQ, SMFQ-short form) - John Seeley
The MFQ is a 32-item questionnaire based on DSM-III-R criteria for depression. Additional items (e.g. loneliness, feeling unloved) were included due to their clinical significance to the construct. An 11 item subscale, based on the discriminating ability between the depressed and nondepressed, was developed as a short form alternative (SMFQ). Each item is to be rated on a 3 point scale: "true", "sometimes true", and "not true" with respect to the events of the past two weeks. Both parent- and child-report forms are available.
Multidemensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) - John Seeley
The MASC is a 39-item measure designed to tap four dimensions of anxiety amongst children: physical symptoms, harm avoidance, social anxiety, and separation/panic. Responses to each item are on a 4 point scale ranging from "Never true" to "Often true". The MASC is equipped with an Inconsistency Index to identify careless responses and an Anxiety Disorder Index to identify when a clinical assessment should be considered.
Observations of Middle School Environments: Classroom - Julie Rusby
Direct observation of staff behavior management practices and overall student behavior in the classroom.
Observations of Middle School Environments: Common Areas - Julie Rusby
Direct observation of staff behavior management practices and overall student behavior in common areas such as hallways/breezeways, lunchroom, outdoors, gym, etc.
Observer Ratings of Middle School Environments: Classroom - Julie Rusby
Observer ratings of staff behavior management practices and student behavior in the classroom.
Observer Ratings of Middle School Environments: Common Area - Julie Rusby
Observer ratings of staff behavior management practices and student behavior in school common areas such as hallways/breezeways, lunchroom, outdoors, gym, etc.
Observer Ratings of Middle School Environments: Overall Walk About - Julie Rusby
An observational rating of the school environment, including the physical features and the overall impression of adult interactions.
Oregon School Safety Survey - Jeffrey Sprague
The Oregon School Safety Survey (OSSS) is designed to assess risk factors and response plans for school safety and violence. This information is useful in determining training and support needs related to school safety and violence prevention.
Positive Action UNIT Implementation Report - Brian Flay
Teacher report of their level of implementation of each UNIT of the Positive Action program.
Positive Action Weekly Implementation Report - Brian Flay
Teacher report of their level of program implementation completed every week
Positive Behavior Support Implementation and Planning Self-Assessment - Jeffrey Sprague
This self-assessment has been designed to serve as a multi-level guide for creating action plans and evaluating implementation of PBS at the school, state and/or district level.
Relational Aggression and Victimization Assessment - Julie Rusby
Self-report measure on the extent to which youth experience and perpetrate relational aggression.
Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS) - John Seeley
The 37-item RCMAS, also known as the "What I Think and Feel" scale, measures persistent symptomatology of trait anxiety based on three subscales: Physiological, Worry/Oversensitivity, and Fear/Concentration. It is not strictly a measure of anxiety as it contains items that have to do with attentional, impulsivity, and peer interaction problems. The RCMAS is equipped with a Lie scale to identify careless responses or bias toward social desirability. The format of response to each item is yes/no signifying whether or not the informant agrees or disagrees with each statement. A total score is calculated by summing the number of yes responses excluding items in the Lie scale. Scores range from 0-28 with higher scores implying more symptoms of anxiety.
Reynold Adolescent Depression Scale (RADS) - John Seeley
The RADS is a 30-item, self report measure of depression based on DSM-III criteria and consists of four subscales: sysphoric mood, anhedonia, negative self-evaluation, and somatic complaints. The respondent is to rate the frequency of each item occurring in the past two weeks on a 4-point Likert-type scale ranging from 1 "almost never" to 4 "most of the time". Total scores range from 30-120 with higher scores representing a greater degree of depressive symptomatology.
Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES) - John Seeley
The RSES is a 10-item self report measure of self-esteem based upon satisfaction of ones self and life. The instrument consists of five positive items and five negative items and need to be scored accordingly by reversing the value of either the positive or negative item responses. Typically, each item is answered on a four point Likert scale ranging from "strongly disagree" to "strongly agree".
School-wide Evaluation Tool (SET) Verion 2.1 - Jeffrey Sprague
SET is designed to assess and evaluate the critical features of school-wide effective behavior support across each academic school year using multiple sources (review of permanent products, observations, and staff and student interviews).
Self-Assessment of the Contextual Fit in Schools - Jeffrey Sprague
The purpose of this interview is to assess the extent to which the elements of a behavior support plan fit the contextual features of your school environment. The interview asks you to rate (a) your knowledge of the elements of the plan, (b) your perception of the extent to which the elements of the behavior support plan are consistent with your personal values, and skills, and (c) the school’s ability to support implementation of the plan. This information will be used to design practical procedures that will help school personnel support children with problem behaviors.
Service Utilization Questionnaire - Charlotte Winter
The Service Utilization Questionnaire has a parent and child version. The questions are about different services and support the teen may have received while growing up. Special ed, Mental health, drug treatment, foster care and hospitalization are covered.
Simple Affect Coding System (SACS) - Charlotte Winter
The Simple Affect Coding System (SACS) is a several category coding system intended to capture the objective display of affect as relationship interactions. The SACS is inspired by several affect coding systems employed over the years. Specifically the work of Paul Ekman and John Gottman has inspired this simple, yet dynamic attempt at operationalizing the often-subjective material of emotional display.
Social Networking Questionnaire - Charlotte Winter
The Social Networking asks respondents about their general feelings about their friendship group, to list their five most important friends, and answer 10 items about each friend. The instrument was designed to assess the child's social network by asking such questions as (1) how many kids they usually spend time with?, (2) how often they feel there is not a group for them to spend time with?, and (3)whether they would like more or fewer friends? Respondents are then asked to list their five most important friends. Questions are asked about each friend concerning the favored activities with that friend, supportiveness, getting into trouble with the friend, age of the friend, ethnicity, gang connections and geographical proximity. The instrument provides quantitative indices of the size, deviance density and characteristics of boys' and girls' networks.
State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children (STAI-C) - John Seeley
The STAI-C consists of two 20-item scales, one assessing state anxiety (A-State) and the other trait anxiety (A-Trait). The former quantifies short-term, situation specific anxiety, while the latter addresses feelings of anxiety in general. Responses to each item are on a three-point scale ranging from "hardly ever" to "often" true. Each scale produces a total score which can be compared with one another to determine the more problematic anxiety type.
Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R) - John Seeley
The brief 4-item SBQ-R is a measure of past suicidal thoughts and attempts which have proved to be significant predictors of future suicidality. The items ask if the respondent has ever thought about or attempted suicide, how frequent were suicidal thoughts in the past year, have they told someone about such thoughts, and what is the likelihood of attempting suicide in the future. The higher the obtained score reflects the higher risk for subsequent suicidal behavior.
Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire (SIQ) - John Seeley
The SIQ evaluates the severity and frequency of suicidal ideation amongst high school students. It is the first step in a two stage evaluation program aimed at suicide prevention in schools. Respondents to the measure rank each of the 15 items on a 7-point scale ranging from 0 ["I never had this thought" (in the last month)] to 6 ["almost every day" (of the last month)]. Each item represents a specific dimension of suicidal ideation. Individual item scores are summed to produce the total score, reflecting severity of suicidal ideation. A total score greater than 41 suggested further evaluation of suicide risk. However, Pinto et al. (1997) argues that a lower cutoff score may be needed.
Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-Junior (SIQ-Jr) - John Seeley
The SIQ-Jr evaluates the severity and frequency of suicidal ideation amongst middle school students. It is the first step in a two stage evaluation program aimed at suicide prevention in schools. Respondents to the measure rank each of the 15 items on a 7-point scale ranging from 0 ["I never had this thought" (in the last month)] to 6 ["almost every day" (of the last month)]. Each item represents a specific dimension of suicidal ideation. Individual item scores are summed to produce the total score, reflecting severity of suicidal ideation. A total score greater than 31 suggests further evaluation of suicide risk.
Teen Interview - Charlotte Winter
The teen interview consists of 4 sections: Substance Consumption, Peer Substance Consumption, Sibling Substance Consumption, and Sexual Behavior. Each section includes questions about alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, and other drugs. The Substance Consumption section, Section A, includes 103 items which systematically address substance type, volume, frequency, age of first use of the substance, problems resulting from substance use, the way in which the substance was acquired, and parental use and attitude about specific substances. The Peer Substance Consumption, Section B, consists of 17 items about type and frequency of substance use by friends, and the frequency of substance use by other classmates. The Sibling Substance Consumption section, Section C, includes 11 items detailing the type and frequency of sibling substance use. The Sexual Behavior section, Section D, consists of 10 items regarding previous parental and other sources of communication about sex, sexual experiences with other- and same-sex partners, contraceptive use, and pregnancy.
The Life Attitudes Schedule-Short Form (LAS-SF) - John Seeley
The LAS-SF is used to measure risk behavior and suicide proneness along a continuum ranging from positive (no risk) to negative (high risk). The scale identifies both subtle and overtly suicidal behaviors. Four domains of behavior are represented within the instrument: death/life related, health/illness related, injury related, and self related. Based on the original 96 item LAS, the short form version is more accessible in some settings or with certain populations. The instrument consists of 24 items in true/false format.
Topic Code (TOPIC) - Charlotte Winter
The TOPIC CODE is a two-category code designed to identify the content in conversation between same sex peers, which is predictive of antisocial behavior. It is a form of discourse analysis that focuses on talk and behavior which contain any symbolic content of "rule breaking" as identified by community standards. The TOPIC CODE is designed to be coded in real time by personal computer. (This is version 3)